Images & Actions

In this photo gallery there are photos documenting just a few of the actions that I organized or in which I took part.

Activism Gallery Captions

1. Photo of Karla Jay in the late 1960s.


2. Photo of Karla Jay after finishing school, circa 1970.


3. Photo of Karla Jay for a book jacket, considered, "too butch" by a book publisher. CREDIT:Jill Posener


4. Editor John Mack Carter and managing editor Lenore Hershey (left) talking with a group of feminists who had invaded Carter's office and staged an 11-hour sit-in.One hundred feminists seized this magazine to demand elimination of their sexist articles and daycare for women workers.  Dressed to kill, I am right of center wearing a headband.


5. Fighting Homophobia: "Take a Lesbian to Lunch"  Moments before zapping New York's Second Congress to Unite Women in May 1970.  From left to right: Rita Mae Brown, Karla Jay (in a hat), Arlene Kisner, Lois Hart, and Martha Shelley.  We are all wearing Lavendar Menace t-shirts under our clothes and carrying the "Woman Identified Woman" manifesto.


6. A tender moment...with three complete strangers.  This photo was rejected for a 1970 Los Angeles Gay-In III poster because it looked "too heterosexual." Karla Jay is wearing a Lavendar Menace t-shirt.


7. Final photo chosen for the 1970 Los Angeles Gay-In III poster.


8. Neither rain, nor sleet, nor snow kept me from marching for human liberation. Lunch bag in hand, my arm around my then partner, June, as we take on Albany, New York in March 1971 to demand civil rights gay men and lesbians. First LGBT Civil Rights March on Albany.


9. Demonstration at the American Museum of Natural History to protest the lack of inclusion of women performing meaningful tasks in history. On International Women's Day, August 26th, 1973.


10. Summer 1978 Cleaning a dog kennel. Working for the movement left me poor with few work options.


11. A light moment during the Pride Rally 1976 Karla Jay was the M.C. of the Pride Rally in Central Park in 1976 along with John Paul Hudson. Special guests included Patti Smith. 


12. Karla Jay in Greece, 1979.


13. Poster for the Redstockings women's movement. https://www.redstockings.org Image of a wild woman breaking broom with logo "Fuck Housework" in antique lettering. Poster credit: Shirley Boccaccio


14. 25th Annual NYC Dyke March June 2017


15. Karla Jay's service dog, Duchess, attends every action Karla does.


16. Stonewall Vigil and Rally for Orlando Massacre 2017. Sign reads "STOP THE HATE".


17. Karla Jay attends Orlando Massacre Vigil and Rally at Stonewall 2017


18. Family photo: Karla Jay, Karen F. Kerner and Duchess on their 25th anniversary in 2017.


19. Karla Jay, Karen F. Kerner at the Womens' March (Resistance March) in January 2017.

 

20.  Sign reading, "Nyet to Trump" Womens' March (Resistance March) in January 2017. 


21. March for Our Lives, Parkland Anti-Gun Rally in February 2018


22. Good Dog Foundation, Therapy Dog Graduation, 2016


23. Anti-Trump Rally in NYC after the election


24.  First National Ogle-In, Winter 1970.  That's me in a groovy hat.


SOME RADICAL GROUPS AND ACTIONS IN THE 1960s-1970s:  CHANGING THE WORLD 

Member, Redstockings, 1969-1971

This Marxist feminist group developed Consciousness Raising and coined the term “The Personal is Political!”  We analyzed gender roles and the politics of housework.  

(Image: “Fuck Housework” poster.  Credit: Shirley Boccaccio) 

Member, Gay Liberation Front

New York, Los Angeles, and Venice, CA.  

I was an early member of all three groups and a founder of the Venice chapter.  We picketed many organizations, such as the New York Times, which would not print the word “gay” in their publications.  We organized dances as an alternative to bars.  We met with the Black Panthers and Young Lords.  As chair of the organization in late 1969, I helped create the first ever lesbian dance at Alternate University in NYC.  The Mafia showed up at the end to beat us up for taking business away from their bars.

Radicalesbians, 1970-72

 We famously created the “Woman-Identified Woman” manifesto and took over the Second Congress to Unite Women on May 1, 1970.  We put lesbianism on the agenda of Women’s Liberation.  

Takeover of Ladies Home Journal, March 1970

One hundred feminists seized this magazine to demand elimination of their sexist articles and daycare for women workers.  John Mack Carter paid us $10,000 to leave and then write an insert—the money went to a revolving bail fund. 

First National Ogle-In, Winter 1970

I created the first ever zap against street harassment.  We whistled at men and commented on the bodies of  Wall St. brokers as they emerged from the subway. Captured in “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry” documentary.  

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

Organizing Committee of Gay Liberation Front Reunion, Stonewall 50, June 2019. 

With a small committee of former GLF members, I have helped organize a 50th anniversary reunion in conjunction with Stonewall 50. I have set up panels and readings in New York, and I chaired the women’s group.


Ambassador, LGBTQ Research Collection, 2008-Present.  Helped curator with Stonewall 50 exhibit and help host events and panels. 

 

Host and Planning Committee, Lambda Literary Awards, 2009-11.


Trustee, Lambda Literary Foundation, 2003-06.  Vice-President, Board of Trustees, 2005-06.


Member, Women’s Democratic Club of Palm Beach County, 2017-Present


Member, BLAST (Bi, Lesbian, and Straight Together), Palm Beach County, 2013-Present.  Annual presenter.


Volunteer, Good Dog Foundation, 2016-18.  Standard Poodle Ms D and I visited stressed out individuals in hospitals and workplaces. 


Board of Directors, Money for Women/Barbara Deming Memorial Fund, (Brooklyn, St. Augustine, and Montreal), 1979-86.  President, 1979-85.


Presenter, Lambda Literary Awards,  2019 Ceremony.

Karla Jay in GLF era.  CREDIT:Jill Posener

Karla Jay in GLF era. CREDIT:Jill Posener

Bloomingdale Aging in Place

Organizer and Leader, World Voices Book Club, BAiP (Bloomingdale Aging in Place, Upper West Side, New York City), 2016-Present. Helping seniors to appreciate diversity through literature other than that of North America and Western Europe. 

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